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John Pilling

John H. Pilling, AIA has been an instructor at the Boston Architectural College since 1993. He was named a member of the faculty in 2009. In his studios, Mr. Pilling works with his colleague, Luis Montalvo, to create exciting learning opportunities for students based on the culture of Mexico and the Caribbean. These travel intensive programs have been conducted with the friendship of the Faculties of Architecture at CUJAE in Havana and campuses of Tec. de Monterrey (ITESM) in Guadalajara and Mexico City. He taught the course, "Designing Architectural Details" from 1993 to 2012, and he has advised 19 students in thesis.

Mr. Pilling, along with Julio César Pérez Hernández and Audun Engh, is one of the organizers of the Havana Urban Design Charrettes sponsored by the Norwegian and Cuban Chapters of the Council of European Urbanism and the International Network for Traditional Building and Urbanism. These events have been conducted annualy since 2007. He is the editor of the reports for each of these charrettes, and he has written articles about them for Cuban Art News.

In addition to his academic work he practices full time in metropolitan Boston at Pilling + Smith Architects. Representative projects are the Caritas St. Mary's Women and Children's Center, the Jenkins Scott Youth and Family Building, Dorchester House and Denison House Day Care Centers, the Fox Center in Haverhill, and Harbor Area Early Childhood Services. Before Pilling + Smith, he worked in Memphis, Cambridge, Boston, and London with a number of firms as a principal and senior architect doing residential site planning, an amusement park, the MBTA's Forest Hills Station, the Hatch Shell restoration study, headquarters for Apollo Computer and Epsilon Data Management, and the Canary Wharf Eastern Segment master plan.

Mr. Pilling received a BA from Dartmouth College in 1968, and a Master of Architecture from the University of Pennsylvania in 1971.