Alert Click here for the latest updates on the COVID-19 policies and resources for the BAC community. Spring classes will be fully online on Monday, March 30, 2020 for all students.More

Questions?
We're here to help:

ce@the-bac.edu
617.585.0135

Important Dates

Oct 28–Nov 5, 2019

Priority Spring 2020 Registration for Certificate Students


Nov 6, 2019–Jan 27, 2020

Spring 2020 General CE Registration (Main, Studio and  01 Session)


Nov 6, 2019–Mar 27, 2020

Spring 2020 General CE Registration (02 Session)


Jan 21–May 16, 2020

Spring 2020 Semester

ALERT: As preventive measures of COVID-19, all on-site classes will transition online beginning March 30. The last class on campus will be March 13. For more information, click here.



Study online or in the heart of Boston's historic Back Bay.

The Boston Architectural College's Continuing Education program offers courses in digital design, interior architecture, landscape architecture, and design studies to non-degree and certificate students. Continuing Education students are welcome to register for individual courses or enroll in one of our Certificate Programs.

REGISTER NOW FOR INDIVIDUAL COURSES!

REGISTER NOW

Current Course Offerings are listed below. For the most up-to-date information and course availability, search the online catalog on Self-Service.

Questions?
We're here to help:

ce@the-bac.edu
617.585.0135

Important Dates

Oct 28–Nov 5, 2019

Priority Spring 2020 Registration for Certificate Students


Nov 6, 2019–Jan 27, 2020

Spring 2020 General CE Registration (Main, Studio and  01 Session)


Nov 6, 2019–Mar 27, 2020

Spring 2020 General CE Registration (02 Session)


Jan 21–May 16, 2020

Spring 2020 Semester

Spring 2020 Second Session

Find Courses in:



Digital Design & Media Arts


DME2009 On-Site Photography

This course is intended for designers and other interested individuals to learn, explore and understand the uses, issues and problems of photography in the field. Students will explore photography as a means of documenting and explaining the built environment. Projects may include photographing historic buildings with public and private, interior and exterior spaces. Special techniques such as panoramas and time-lapse photography could be explored for conveying space, flow, and time. Some class meetings will involve field trips and local travel will be necessary to complete photography assignments. [1.5 Credits]

Section Session Dates Day Time Tuition
BC 02 Mar 23–May 16 Monday 4–7pm $960


DME2028 Digital Fabrication and Model Making

This course introduces students to the techniques of rapid prototyping and the creation physical objects through the use of digital fabrication techniques. Students who enroll in this course are expected to have prior knowledge of basic 3D modeling techniques. Assignments will cover the fundamentals of digital fabrication including 3D printing, laser cutting, and CNC routing, as well as the software associated with these workflows. Uses and applications of digital fabrication will be covered, along with material studies and assembly processes. Coursework will examine the digital craft of model creation as well as the possibilities for scripted parametric fabrication processes, focusing on a series of iterative explorations culminating in a final project. [1.5 Credits]

Section Session Dates Day Time Tuition
AC 02 Mar 23–May 16 Wednesday 7:15–10:15pm $960


DME2037 Rendering with V-Ray

This course is an introduction to the theory and techniques to produce photorealistic renderings using the rendering plugin V-Ray. V-Ray is compatible with several 3D modeling programs including Rhino, Sketchup, Revit, and 3ds Max. Students will learn to apply rendering techniques to create professional, photorealistic imagery and visual effects. This course covers critical V-Ray concepts including materials, textures, lighting, color mapping, reflections, and camera controls. Prior knowledge of 3D modeling software is recommended. [1.5 Credits]

Section Session Dates Day Time Tuition
AC 02 Mar 23–May 16 Tuesday 7:15–10:15pm $960


DME2045 Advanced 3D Modeling and Form* (Landscape Architecture)

*Pre-requisite: DME2042 or DME2044

This second-level CAD course is for individuals already having a basic knowledge of AutoCAD who desire to explore and extend their expertise focusing on site design graphics. Students will learn about incorporating files from other design consultants and illustrative techniques available in AutoCAD to highlight pertinent information for site plans, sections, and elevations. Additional techniques will be covered in Adobe Photoshop and Illustrator in order to create content for AutoCAD. [1.5 Credits]

Section Session Dates Day Time Tuition
AC 02 Mar 23–May 16 Thursday 7:15–10:15pm $960


DME2047 3D Studio Max 2: Rendering and Animation*

*Pre-requisite: DME2046

This is a second level course for individuals already having a basic knowledge of 3ds Max. Topics covered in this course will focus on advanced modeling techniques and visualization workflows. 3ds Max will be used to generate detailed, geometrically accurate 3D models. The VRay rendering plugin will be used to generate photo-realistic renderings which depict lighting, materiality, and atmosphere. Techniques of lighting, creating atmospheric effects, placing cameras, choosing materials and setting their properties, and applying textures will be covered. Students may use provided building models for their rendering and animation assignments or may work from models they have built in previous classes. Assignments will culminate in a set of presentation-quality rendered images created using the VRay rendering plugin. [1.5 Credits]

Section Session Dates Day Time Tuition
AC 02 Mar 23–May 16 Wednesday 7:15–10:15pm $960

DME2055 Algorithmic Design – Grasshopper

This course aims to familiarize the student to the concept of computational design, broadly defined and understood as formal investigations based on non-linear 3D modeling approaches that are considered in a traditional perspective as counterintuitive or anathematic to traditional generative design philosophy and processes. The course will identify and build these concepts using Grasshopper as a geometric modeler - a plug-in module for the Rhino modeling software - as the prime arena for these investigations.
Computational analogues in support of design present themselves as open structures making explicit design as a modeling developmental process, adaptable to formulating and exploring new solutions to problems that were previously considered elusive or hidden underneath the final design outcome or byproduct. The recent capabilities of computational design environments have transcended to various fields of science with keen philosophical implications that expose the lack of acknowledgement of patterns previously misconstrued as non-orderly or, at the very least, incoherent, readdressing these as a complex behavior. Now, through digital and cultural meditation, computational environments have been adapted to design and an architectural practice in the form of specialized software modules such as is the case with Grasshopper.
The Grasshopper plug-in for Rhino features an innovative interface described as a graphical algorithmic editor, one of the few of its kind in use for 3D modeling, exposing the process and allowing the easy flow and exploration of new ideas. The series of exercises throughout the course permit familiarizing with the interface, build upon each other and, with practice, allow understanding how to encapsulate complex instructions - given as inputs processed through the software as dynamically modifiable outputs - into user-definable and simpler modifiable units in order to subsequently re-evaluate the available parameters and develop new sequences and therein 3D geometric structures. [1.5 Credits]

Section Session Dates Day Time Tuition
AC 02 Mar 23–May 16 Monday 7:15–10:15pm $960


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Interior Architecture / Interior Design


INT3101 Human & Social Factors in Interiors

This course addresses the design application of principles based in environmental psychology, anthropometrics, ergonomics and neural/sensory-perceptual studies. The emphasis of the course will be on application in professional practice. Emerging issues, examples of inappropriate design, and the implications of a human factors approach for design theory will be discussed. Students will examine the potential for applying the methodological contributions of the behavioral sciences to pre-design investigation. [3 Credits]

Section Session Dates Day Time Tuition
1ZC 02 Mar 23–May 16 Online Online $1,920


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Real Estate Development


REA3014 Real Estate Technologies

As the profession of real estate development becomes more interdisciplinary, understanding the technological applications to completing a successful project is a necessity for any developer. This course will cover techniques such as advanced Microsoft excel, construction scheduling software, energy modeling software and other web based applications that support community engagement. [1.5 credits]

Section Session Dates Day Time Tuition
AC 02 Mar 23–May 16 Tuesday 7:15–10:15pm $960


REA3019 Introduction to Community Development

This course is based on the history and current practice of the community development process, the empowerment of communities through resident leadership and the active participation of people living in neighborhoods where years of neglect by real estate developers left a deteriorating housing stock, boarded-up storefronts and other signs of disinvestment. This is a place making course that takes into consideration the history of the struggle for land use in inner city communities that have encountered systematic neglect from developers. It also includes a summary of the development of affordable housing, main street district storefronts, youth centers and other community based real estate initiatives that have emerged over the past five decades since landmark federal legislation such as the Civil Rights Act (1964) and the Community Reinvestment Act (1977). Introduction to Community Development details how past, active, and future real estate deals are connected to and arise from community leadership. Other topics include the expansion of a network of Community Development Corporations (CDCs), Business Improvement Districts (BIDs), Main Streets, and other non-profits directly involved in place making and land use decisions. Positive outcomes that reflect the desire of residents will also treated in some detail. Attention will be given to the financing of community development projects through government grants, private foundations, tax credits, and other gap funding sources. A history and summary of key community leaders in Greater Boston and other cities nationally is included. Emerging trends such as New Urbanism, Smart Growth, Greening the City, Green Buildings, and Historic Preservation are also profiled as communities expand the range of projects they are demanding. At the end of the first week, students will be divided into two group: Group 1 - The Development Team; and Group 2: The Neighborhood to prepare a presentation and push-back for a major real estate development in Dudley Square. This will lead to a final class that models a Zoning Board of Appeal s (ZBA) hearing. Students should anticipate a series of guest lectures from community practitioners working on a wide range of real estate projects. [1.5 credits]

Section Session Dates Day Time Tuition
AC 02 Mar 23–May 16 Thursday 7:15–10:15pm $960

Return to Top


Sustainable Design



SUS2025 Greening Existing Buildings

The existing building stock is here and much of it is responsible for consuming energy, water and other resources at an unsustainable rate from both the environmental and the economic standpoints. Focusing on non-residential buildings, this course will examine the issues, techniques and processes that are involved in turning these buildings into sustainable consumers, whether through relatively simple retrofits or major renovations. Among the topics to be reviewed will be assessing existing performance, instituting building commissioning, improving energy and water efficiency, limiting (re)construction waste, improving indoor environmental quality, supporting sustainable operations and considering renewable energy sources. [1.5 Credits]

Section Session Dates Day Time Tuition
1ZC 02 Mar 23–May 16 Online Online $960

SUS2028 Energy Modeling in Building Design

With the development of increasingly sophisticated software, energy modeling has become an integral part of commercial & institutional building design. Making energy performance a manipulable element at the earliest stages of building design is essential to sustainable building design. This course will provide an overview of energy modeling of commercial & institutional buildings, an introduction to the most popular energy modeling packages- including hands-on experience with at least one of them- and a discussion of how to make use of energy modeling results in the design process. The relationship of energy modeling to green building rating systems will also be explored. Students shall have a Windows based PC or a Mac that has Windows virtual environment (e.g. Parallels, VWware Fusion, or Oracle VM Virtual Box) and a copy of Windows 7 or Windows XP installed in order to run the eQUEST energy modeling program.' [1.5 credits]

Section Session Dates Day Time Tuition
1ZC 02 Mar 23–May 16 Online Online $960

SUS2030 Materials, Resources and Indoor Environmental Quality

This course gives students the tools they need to evaluate a material based on how it impacts the built and natural environment. Since people in western cultures tend to spend most of their time indoors, specific attention will be paid to Indoor Environmental Quality (IEQ). Environmentally responsible materials selection will be discussed, including the importance of waste, Life Cycle Assessment (LCA), and all aspects of the manufacturing process. Interior design issues that are covered include the importance of natural daylighting, Indoor Air Quality (IAQ), and acoustics. Current materials rating systems and specification writing aids will be reviewed. Case studies representing best practices in sustainable design of interiors will be presented for discussion. This course is directly useful to anyone selecting materials for any kind of building project. [1.5 Credits]

Section Session Dates Day Time Tuition
1ZC 02 Mar 23–May 16 Online Online $960

SUS2033 Building Envelope

It is the building enclosure where many sustainable design intentions find their physical expression. Here, as well, is where the majority of legal claims against designers find their expression. The building enclosure has three major assemblies-foundation, walls, and roof- each with as many as 10 (or more) components. Sustainable design requires integration of these assemblies and their components in a way that manages the major degradation vectors- water, air, heat, radiation, pests, and even occupants. This course will cover the building enclosures for both commercial and residential structures. A major focus of the course will be the relationships among green building, building science, energy efficiency, durability, and risk management. Students will leave the course with a new way of understanding, analyzing, and designing sustainable enclosures. An equal emphasis will be placed on design, specification, construction, and commissioning of building enclosures. [1.5 Credits]

Section Session Dates Day Time Tuition
1ZC 02 Mar 23–May 16 Online Onlline $960

SUS2035 Sustainable Communities: Land Use, Transportation and Planning

This course will examine how communities across the nation are grappling with such smart growth issues as affordable housing, sprawl, urban revitalization, economic development, transportation investments, and open space protection. These issues are also collectively referred to as sustainable development, growth management or New Urbanism. The course will cover the history of sprawl and current policy debates about land use, urban design, regulation, and public and private investment. The course will feature critiques of specific development projects, tailored to the interests of students. [1.5 credits]

Section Session Dates Day Time Tuition
1ZC 02 Mar 23–May 16 Online Online $960


SUS2046 Resilient Design

Resilience is the ability of a system to bounce back from disruptions or interruptions. As climate change advances, we will face increased storm intensity, flooding, heat waves, drought, and wildfire, while terrorism or political strife could result in extended power outages and interruptions in heating or transportation fuels. To prepare for these risks, buildings and communities should be designed to be more resilient.

This online course will examine both the context for resilience and practical strategies for achieving resilient buildings and communities. Elements include the siting of buildings and infrastructure to protect against flooding, land-use planning to ensure functionality in the event of gasoline shortages, high-performance building designs that will maintain livable conditions during extended power outages or loss of heating fuel, water supply and delivery options for times of drought or power outages, and renewable energy systems that can function during power outages. All of these measures also contribute to sustainability. [1.5 Credits]

Section Session Dates Day Time Tuition
1ZC 02 Mar 23–May 16 Online Online $960

Return to Top



Design for Human Health


DHH3019 Biophilia

This course will examine the principles of Biophilia as they relate to biomimicry, human evolution, and the Design Thinking Process. [1.5 credits]

Section Session Dates Day Time Tuition
1ZC 02 Mar 23–May 16 Online Online $960


Return to Top


Spring 2020 Second Session

Find Courses in:



Digital Design & Media Arts


DME2009 On-Site Photography

This course is intended for designers and other interested individuals to learn, explore and understand the uses, issues and problems of photography in the field. Students will explore photography as a means of documenting and explaining the built environment. Projects may include photographing historic buildings with public and private, interior and exterior spaces. Special techniques such as panoramas and time-lapse photography could be explored for conveying space, flow, and time. Some class meetings will involve field trips and local travel will be necessary to complete photography assignments. [1.5 Credits]

Section Session Dates Day Time Tuition
BC 02 Mar 23–May 16 Monday 4–7pm $960


DME2028 Digital Fabrication and Model Making

This course introduces students to the techniques of rapid prototyping and the creation physical objects through the use of digital fabrication techniques. Students who enroll in this course are expected to have prior knowledge of basic 3D modeling techniques. Assignments will cover the fundamentals of digital fabrication including 3D printing, laser cutting, and CNC routing, as well as the software associated with these workflows. Uses and applications of digital fabrication will be covered, along with material studies and assembly processes. Coursework will examine the digital craft of model creation as well as the possibilities for scripted parametric fabrication processes, focusing on a series of iterative explorations culminating in a final project. [1.5 Credits]

Section Session Dates Day Time Tuition
AC 02 Mar 23–May 16 Wednesday 7:15–10:15pm $960


DME2037 Rendering with V-Ray

This course is an introduction to the theory and techniques to produce photorealistic renderings using the rendering plugin V-Ray. V-Ray is compatible with several 3D modeling programs including Rhino, Sketchup, Revit, and 3ds Max. Students will learn to apply rendering techniques to create professional, photorealistic imagery and visual effects. This course covers critical V-Ray concepts including materials, textures, lighting, color mapping, reflections, and camera controls. Prior knowledge of 3D modeling software is recommended. [1.5 Credits]

Section Session Dates Day Time Tuition
AC 02 Mar 23–May 16 Tuesday 7:15–10:15pm $960


DME2045 Advanced 3D Modeling and Form* (Landscape Architecture)

*Pre-requisite: DME2042 or DME2044

This second-level CAD course is for individuals already having a basic knowledge of AutoCAD who desire to explore and extend their expertise focusing on site design graphics. Students will learn about incorporating files from other design consultants and illustrative techniques available in AutoCAD to highlight pertinent information for site plans, sections, and elevations. Additional techniques will be covered in Adobe Photoshop and Illustrator in order to create content for AutoCAD. [1.5 Credits]

Section Session Dates Day Time Tuition
AC 02 Mar 23–May 16 Thursday 7:15–10:15pm $960


DME2047 3D Studio Max 2: Rendering and Animation*

*Pre-requisite: DME2046

This is a second level course for individuals already having a basic knowledge of 3ds Max. Topics covered in this course will focus on advanced modeling techniques and visualization workflows. 3ds Max will be used to generate detailed, geometrically accurate 3D models. The VRay rendering plugin will be used to generate photo-realistic renderings which depict lighting, materiality, and atmosphere. Techniques of lighting, creating atmospheric effects, placing cameras, choosing materials and setting their properties, and applying textures will be covered. Students may use provided building models for their rendering and animation assignments or may work from models they have built in previous classes. Assignments will culminate in a set of presentation-quality rendered images created using the VRay rendering plugin. [1.5 Credits]

Section Session Dates Day Time Tuition
AC 02 Mar 23–May 16 Wednesday 7:15–10:15pm $960

DME2055 Algorithmic Design – Grasshopper

This course aims to familiarize the student to the concept of computational design, broadly defined and understood as formal investigations based on non-linear 3D modeling approaches that are considered in a traditional perspective as counterintuitive or anathematic to traditional generative design philosophy and processes. The course will identify and build these concepts using Grasshopper as a geometric modeler - a plug-in module for the Rhino modeling software - as the prime arena for these investigations.
Computational analogues in support of design present themselves as open structures making explicit design as a modeling developmental process, adaptable to formulating and exploring new solutions to problems that were previously considered elusive or hidden underneath the final design outcome or byproduct. The recent capabilities of computational design environments have transcended to various fields of science with keen philosophical implications that expose the lack of acknowledgement of patterns previously misconstrued as non-orderly or, at the very least, incoherent, readdressing these as a complex behavior. Now, through digital and cultural meditation, computational environments have been adapted to design and an architectural practice in the form of specialized software modules such as is the case with Grasshopper.
The Grasshopper plug-in for Rhino features an innovative interface described as a graphical algorithmic editor, one of the few of its kind in use for 3D modeling, exposing the process and allowing the easy flow and exploration of new ideas. The series of exercises throughout the course permit familiarizing with the interface, build upon each other and, with practice, allow understanding how to encapsulate complex instructions - given as inputs processed through the software as dynamically modifiable outputs - into user-definable and simpler modifiable units in order to subsequently re-evaluate the available parameters and develop new sequences and therein 3D geometric structures. [1.5 Credits]

Section Session Dates Day Time Tuition
AC 02 Mar 23–May 16 Monday 7:15–10:15pm $960


Return to Top


Interior Architecture / Interior Design


INT3101 Human & Social Factors in Interiors

This course addresses the design application of principles based in environmental psychology, anthropometrics, ergonomics and neural/sensory-perceptual studies. The emphasis of the course will be on application in professional practice. Emerging issues, examples of inappropriate design, and the implications of a human factors approach for design theory will be discussed. Students will examine the potential for applying the methodological contributions of the behavioral sciences to pre-design investigation. [3 Credits]

Section Session Dates Day Time Tuition
1ZC 02 Mar 23–May 16 Online Online $1,920


Return to Top


Real Estate Development


REA3014 Real Estate Technologies

As the profession of real estate development becomes more interdisciplinary, understanding the technological applications to completing a successful project is a necessity for any developer. This course will cover techniques such as advanced Microsoft excel, construction scheduling software, energy modeling software and other web based applications that support community engagement. [1.5 credits]

Section Session Dates Day Time Tuition
AC 02 Mar 23–May 16 Tuesday 7:15–10:15pm $960


REA3019 Introduction to Community Development

This course is based on the history and current practice of the community development process, the empowerment of communities through resident leadership and the active participation of people living in neighborhoods where years of neglect by real estate developers left a deteriorating housing stock, boarded-up storefronts and other signs of disinvestment. This is a place making course that takes into consideration the history of the struggle for land use in inner city communities that have encountered systematic neglect from developers. It also includes a summary of the development of affordable housing, main street district storefronts, youth centers and other community based real estate initiatives that have emerged over the past five decades since landmark federal legislation such as the Civil Rights Act (1964) and the Community Reinvestment Act (1977). Introduction to Community Development details how past, active, and future real estate deals are connected to and arise from community leadership. Other topics include the expansion of a network of Community Development Corporations (CDCs), Business Improvement Districts (BIDs), Main Streets, and other non-profits directly involved in place making and land use decisions. Positive outcomes that reflect the desire of residents will also treated in some detail. Attention will be given to the financing of community development projects through government grants, private foundations, tax credits, and other gap funding sources. A history and summary of key community leaders in Greater Boston and other cities nationally is included. Emerging trends such as New Urbanism, Smart Growth, Greening the City, Green Buildings, and Historic Preservation are also profiled as communities expand the range of projects they are demanding. At the end of the first week, students will be divided into two group: Group 1 - The Development Team; and Group 2: The Neighborhood to prepare a presentation and push-back for a major real estate development in Dudley Square. This will lead to a final class that models a Zoning Board of Appeal s (ZBA) hearing. Students should anticipate a series of guest lectures from community practitioners working on a wide range of real estate projects. [1.5 credits]

Section Session Dates Day Time Tuition
AC 02 Mar 23–May 16 Thursday 7:15–10:15pm $960

Return to Top


Sustainable Design



SUS2025 Greening Existing Buildings

The existing building stock is here and much of it is responsible for consuming energy, water and other resources at an unsustainable rate from both the environmental and the economic standpoints. Focusing on non-residential buildings, this course will examine the issues, techniques and processes that are involved in turning these buildings into sustainable consumers, whether through relatively simple retrofits or major renovations. Among the topics to be reviewed will be assessing existing performance, instituting building commissioning, improving energy and water efficiency, limiting (re)construction waste, improving indoor environmental quality, supporting sustainable operations and considering renewable energy sources. [1.5 Credits]

Section Session Dates Day Time Tuition
1ZC 02 Mar 23–May 16 Online Online $960

SUS2028 Energy Modeling in Building Design

With the development of increasingly sophisticated software, energy modeling has become an integral part of commercial & institutional building design. Making energy performance a manipulable element at the earliest stages of building design is essential to sustainable building design. This course will provide an overview of energy modeling of commercial & institutional buildings, an introduction to the most popular energy modeling packages- including hands-on experience with at least one of them- and a discussion of how to make use of energy modeling results in the design process. The relationship of energy modeling to green building rating systems will also be explored. Students shall have a Windows based PC or a Mac that has Windows virtual environment (e.g. Parallels, VWware Fusion, or Oracle VM Virtual Box) and a copy of Windows 7 or Windows XP installed in order to run the eQUEST energy modeling program.' [1.5 credits]

Section Session Dates Day Time Tuition
1ZC 02 Mar 23–May 16 Online Online $960

SUS2030 Materials, Resources and Indoor Environmental Quality

This course gives students the tools they need to evaluate a material based on how it impacts the built and natural environment. Since people in western cultures tend to spend most of their time indoors, specific attention will be paid to Indoor Environmental Quality (IEQ). Environmentally responsible materials selection will be discussed, including the importance of waste, Life Cycle Assessment (LCA), and all aspects of the manufacturing process. Interior design issues that are covered include the importance of natural daylighting, Indoor Air Quality (IAQ), and acoustics. Current materials rating systems and specification writing aids will be reviewed. Case studies representing best practices in sustainable design of interiors will be presented for discussion. This course is directly useful to anyone selecting materials for any kind of building project. [1.5 Credits]

Section Session Dates Day Time Tuition
1ZC 02 Mar 23–May 16 Online Online $960

SUS2033 Building Envelope

It is the building enclosure where many sustainable design intentions find their physical expression. Here, as well, is where the majority of legal claims against designers find their expression. The building enclosure has three major assemblies-foundation, walls, and roof- each with as many as 10 (or more) components. Sustainable design requires integration of these assemblies and their components in a way that manages the major degradation vectors- water, air, heat, radiation, pests, and even occupants. This course will cover the building enclosures for both commercial and residential structures. A major focus of the course will be the relationships among green building, building science, energy efficiency, durability, and risk management. Students will leave the course with a new way of understanding, analyzing, and designing sustainable enclosures. An equal emphasis will be placed on design, specification, construction, and commissioning of building enclosures. [1.5 Credits]

Section Session Dates Day Time Tuition
1ZC 02 Mar 23–May 16 Online Onlline $960

SUS2035 Sustainable Communities: Land Use, Transportation and Planning

This course will examine how communities across the nation are grappling with such smart growth issues as affordable housing, sprawl, urban revitalization, economic development, transportation investments, and open space protection. These issues are also collectively referred to as sustainable development, growth management or New Urbanism. The course will cover the history of sprawl and current policy debates about land use, urban design, regulation, and public and private investment. The course will feature critiques of specific development projects, tailored to the interests of students. [1.5 credits]

Section Session Dates Day Time Tuition
1ZC 02 Mar 23–May 16 Online Online $960


SUS2046 Resilient Design

Resilience is the ability of a system to bounce back from disruptions or interruptions. As climate change advances, we will face increased storm intensity, flooding, heat waves, drought, and wildfire, while terrorism or political strife could result in extended power outages and interruptions in heating or transportation fuels. To prepare for these risks, buildings and communities should be designed to be more resilient.

This online course will examine both the context for resilience and practical strategies for achieving resilient buildings and communities. Elements include the siting of buildings and infrastructure to protect against flooding, land-use planning to ensure functionality in the event of gasoline shortages, high-performance building designs that will maintain livable conditions during extended power outages or loss of heating fuel, water supply and delivery options for times of drought or power outages, and renewable energy systems that can function during power outages. All of these measures also contribute to sustainability. [1.5 Credits]

Section Session Dates Day Time Tuition
1ZC 02 Mar 23–May 16 Online Online $960

Return to Top



Design for Human Health


DHH3019 Biophilia

This course will examine the principles of Biophilia as they relate to biomimicry, human evolution, and the Design Thinking Process. [1.5 credits]

Section Session Dates Day Time Tuition
1ZC 02 Mar 23–May 16 Online Online $960


Return to Top